One Light

Interior work is unlike any other form of photography – the lighting is complex and requires delicate planning and balance. Even more so, to make images “sexy”, as famous architectural photographer Scott Hargis puts it, you typically put multiple strobes in separate areas of a room or even outside a window to create the illusion of natural light. Scott’s method is quite unique and took years of trial and error to perfect. One of the aspects I have yet to try in his published workflow is the bounce umbrella. I’ve only used shoot throughs or bounce diffusers but absolutely see the appeal is bouncing the hard light to make it softer and wider.

The current technique I’m working on is meant to speed up my onsite time but is slow during the post-processing. It’s Nathan Cool’s one light strobing technique and you go to each room or sections of open space in a single room to light them separately with your light-on-a-stick. It definitely creates a harder light and the shadows can be tedious to deal with but, like I said, the onsite time has decreased by about 30%-40%. I’m currently averaging about 85 minutes onsite for a 1700sqft house and 2-3 hours in post processing. With the multi-strobe technique I think my work was getting to be better quality but was taking 120-150 minutes of onsite time with 2-3 hours of processing.

Here I am lighting the far side of the room, next I would have lit the black hole on the left.

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By | 2017-06-09T10:17:43+00:00 June 9th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

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