Building Your Brand

Building your brand is about using the power of visual social marketing. When first starting a career in photography I was told, “Wedding Photography is 90% looking the part and 10% of actual photography.” Translate that into Real Estate and you get the same general principle Building yourself in the way that captivates audiences and makes them want to trust and listen to you.

According to Pia Silver, author of Badass Your Brand, she says:

” Gorgeous photos present you as a thought leader. You could be the most badass thought leader in your industry, [but] if you don’t look it, if you don’t present like it, no one’s going to listen to you.

… If you want to be a thought leader in your industry, you’re going to want to invest in your brand. And that means investing in photos, videos, social media and your writing.”

Check out her video:

By | 2017-05-18T16:23:45+00:00 April 19th, 2017|Uncategorized|0 Comments

The Small Details

Composing shots, placing external light sources, and capturing multiple exposures are all small details of a great Real Estate photograph. Don’t let these steps get in the way of what you’re on site to do. Showing the potential buyers exactly what a home represents. All too often we get caught up in what the customer wants, and forget the real one – the home purchaser. It’s quite unethical to fix major paint spots, scratches/dings on the wall, or even carpet stains just to make the home appear more attractive than it really is.

Now that we’ve covered that – it’s also important to ensure you’re correcting the distortion effects of the lens. This means correcting verticals and using a lens profile to fix any known warping issues. If you’re unsure how to do this – be sure to check out Rich Baum’s great tutorials on Youtube…

By | 2017-05-18T16:23:45+00:00 November 30th, 2016|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Ambient Masking

Flashes are great for interior – but there is something that really makes photos pop. Ambient layer masking is when you take a longer exposure (no flash) with the intention to lighten the photo and ease harsh shadows in Photoshop. Typically, the windows and lights are blown out but we’re concerned with the walls and ambient shadows. Once you have the flash and/or HDR shot of the interior edited, bring it and the color corrected ambient shot into Photoshop as layers. Then create an inverted (option) layer mask and use a 0% hardness brush with a 3% flow and brighten the harsh shadows while adding smooth ones to the obvious flashed areas. There are some great videos that demonstrate this – I would recommend Rich Baum on Youtube. Good luck and happy shooting!

By | 2016-11-09T22:00:55+00:00 November 9th, 2016|Uncategorized|0 Comments

Light-Saber Flash

While the flash did compensate for some of the orange hue given off by ambient lighting, it was a little over dramatic. Adjusting the flash power and instead of directly facing it to the subject, bouncing it from a corner or wall was much more effective. Setting up the tripod and leaving it in place was taking too much time, it was easier to walk around with the units in hand and “light-pant” by pointing the light away from the subject and let the light flood off a wall/corners.

Instead of the typical 1 base flash shot and 5 bracketed shots for HDR – I did 5 bracketed shots that all had the flash bounce. Not only that but most interior photographers keep their aperture set around f8-f9 creating a decent depth of field – I was shooting at F16! This meant I spent a lot more time on site AND off site in post production. The amount of spots shown (from sensor or lens) was significant and the time it took for the shutter speed to compensate for the smaller aperture was likely increased by double!

Is the depth of field that much better at F16 than F8 or is it considered time wasted? You decide and tell your story.

 

By | 2016-10-16T11:14:53+00:00 October 16th, 2016|Uncategorized|0 Comments

HDR + Flash

Starting Real Estate Photography with nothing more than a tripod and camera, I was unaware of the ramifications of only using HDR with only ambient lighting. Muddy images – grainy and mis-colored edging combined with something that just looks off. It’s not crisp and clean like some photos you see in magazine articles.

Well no more I say! Tomorrow is the day flash photography will be integrated with HDR to bring out those crisp edges and clear whites. Simply by going on Amazon and looking for the highest rated flashes + radio transmitter/receiver, my post production time should be reduced by 60%.

Here is the technique I’ll be using in numbered steps:

  1. Frame the shot and spot meter the darkest area. Using an aperture (priority) of around f8-f9 finding the correct shutter speed. (ISO hopefully at 200 or less)
  2. Using the shutter speed suggested, go ahead and bring that up 1 stop to ensure the darks will actually be dark enough to compensate for the flash.
  3. Setup flashes accordingly on tripods. More than likely there will be 1 next to the camera and others in viewable rooms or highlighting areas that we want to showoff.
  4. Take a few test shots identifying any changes that need to be made. This will be the baseline shot with proper color balance and detail.
  5. Next I’ll probably turn the flashes off and bracket 5-7 shots starting with the fastest shutter speed (from item 2).
  6. In post production I’ll then process the bracketed images using Photomatix or similar followed by using layer masks on the HDR image and baseline (flash) image.
  7. Using the brush tool I’ll then put in the details that were muddled by HDR while still retaining the correct ambiance.
By | 2017-05-18T16:23:45+00:00 October 7th, 2016|Uncategorized|0 Comments